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How it all began

 

 

 

About Emily Kerrigan

Emily is a food writer and mum of two. She has interviewed many of Britain's top food producers and reviewed restaurants and hotels from St Ives to Sydney, including for high-profile titles that she has to keep under her hat. She is an ambassador for Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution and contributes each month to BBC Good Food. Her food and travel writing has appeared regularly in Time OutoliveMr & Mrs Smith & Smith & Family. Before starting a family, she edited recipes for the BBC's best-selling food magazines. All her recipes are triple-tested and simple enough that any parent can follow them, no matter how sleep-deprived or time-poor. She tries not to get wound up when her kids eat broccoli one day but decide to dislike it the next and looks forward to the day they're old enough to bring their mum and dad breakfast in bed. For samples of her published writing, please visit emilykerrigan.co.uk

About Modern Family Food

None of the kids' cookbooks on my bookshelf felt current. Many hid vegetables in sauces (shouldn't kids learn what an aubergine looks like?) or turned pizzas into emoticons (as if I had time to make tea look like a toy). The rest contained recipes for children to cook on their own, mainly cupcakes - fine for a bit of baking, but nothing that taught them how to make an actual balanced meal. I started Modern Family Food so that we could all cook together, the way I did with my mum. Back then, there were no separate children’s menus. Little kids ate grown-up food, just on smaller plates. I needed my own modern recipes that fitted in with our busy young family, got us out of a rut and that the kids could help prepare. I wasn’t necessarily trying to teach them to follow recipes independently from start to finish - they were too young for that - but I hoped that it would become normal for them to stand on tiptoe at the kitchen counter and help rip up some basil or juice a lemon. At least then, they might eat the salad I was making rather than regarding it with suspicion. And above all, I wanted my kids to grow up with happy memories of home cooking not learning to stand in line for a Big Kahoona burger.